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Dinners of the Past: Beefsteak

  • Museum of Food and Drink 62 Bayard Street Brooklyn, NY, 11222 United States (map)

In 1939, New Yorker writer Joseph Mitchell described a beefsteak as "a form of gluttony as stylized and regional as the riverbank fish fry, the hot-rock clambake, or the Texas barbeque." MOFAD, in conjunction with chef Josh Stokes and food entrepreneur Franz Aliquo, are bringing back this historic, stylized New York City institution of gluttony with an evening of all you can eat steak and all you can drink beer. No utensils. No napkins. Just an apron between you and a pile of meat.

While eating and drinking your fill, learn the theories on how this event got started in 19th century New York and why some thought it was "debased" from beefsteak scholar Paul Lukas, and finally answer the question of just how much steak you can eat in one night.

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About Joshua Stokes

Joshua’s life has always revolved around food. It is what inspires him and what drives him. Curiosity keeps him engaged and in the kitchen. “Delicious” is what he strives for everyday. 

Joshua remains influenced by the years he spent in Italy and in some of New York’s fanciest kitchens.  In 2010, he was the winner of an episode of Chopped. These days, he runs a boutique catering company in order to create memories for people in the form of delicious meals. He hopes the Beefsteak is one you will never forget.

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About Franz Aliquo

Franz Aliquo is a lawyer, award-winning creative director, food entrepreneur, artist and builder of numerous experimental companies and cultural experiences. Participation, story-building, interactivity, play and collaboration are recurring themes in his work. 

Franz founded 666 Burger, the satanically themed burger truck that sells the most expensive burger in the world; popularized the Miracle fruit; established a secret pizza sharing society (SSPDS); and has organized numerous underground dining experiences. His most recent endeavor is an app-based pizza sharing game built on top of blockchain technology and powered by a pizza-backed currency.

About Paul Lukas

Paul Lukas has written extensively about food, with an emphasis on meat, for The New York TimesSaveur, Gourmet, and many other publications. His 2008 New York Times article about the New Jersey beefsteak scene helped trigger a revival of beefsteak culture across the river in Manhattan and Brooklyn, and he has served as an advisor for several beefsteak events. He also works as a columnist for ESPN.com, where he writes "Uni Watch," the sports world's foremost (okay, only) column devoted to uniform and logo design.

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John Hutt is a lifelong chef with a passion for and interest in the theory, history, science, and culture of food. He has opened restaurants, written papers, cooked a lot of food for a lot of people, and travelled the world eating and drinking delicious things. He came to MOFAD from the El Bulli institute in Barcelona where he was working on the theory and practice of food and cooking. 

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About Sir Kensington's

At Sir Kensington's, our mission is to bring integrity and charm to ordinary and overlooked food. We make delicious and award-winning mayos, ketchups, and mustards that you can find in supermarkets and restaurants across the country. What gives our condiments their character is the premium ingredients we use to make them. When it comes to ingredients, we are just as proud of what we put in as what we leave out. Our mission guides us to source from as close to nature as possible, making our products more refined because they’re less refined. 

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This program is part of Feasts and Festivals, a program series that examines food and drink’s central role in celebrations, ceremonies, and rituals across the globe. For more information, click here.


*Ticket Refund Policy: Full refund with 48 hours notice, 50% refund with 24 hours notice, and no refund with less than 24 hours notice.

Photo: Beefsteak for the Yiddish Theatrical Alliance, 1932